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Common Mistakes in Bridge taught by Tina McVeigh.

Today’s article is a taste of some excellent free videos produced and made available by Tina McVeigh who has run the most successful House of Cards Bridge Club in Christchurch for some 22 years. More of the videos shortly but firstly the lead problem:

Bridge in NZ.pngnz map.jpg

     
East Deals
Both Vul
 
N
W   E
S
   
 
8 7
J 10 9 6 5
4 3 2
10 5 2
West North East South
    1  Pass
2  Pass 2 NT Pass
3 NT All pass    

 

2NT shows 15-17 balanced. What would you lead?

Common Mistakes in Bridge taught by Tina McVeigh

Watch the first video in this series of four lessons. Register to receive the following three videos on a weekly basis.

Please share with your bridge friends! Thank you!

https://learnbridgeonline.com/tina-mcveigh/

 

Work with your partner

by Tina McVeigh

“Do you sometimes forget to think about your partner’s hand or ignore the clues in the auction? You’re not alone – it is a common mistake.

Look at the hand above. You are on lead against 3NT. You would like to set up some heart tricks. Should you lead a heart and, if so, which heart? If not, what is your alternative?

Opening leads are often critical and you should give your choice careful thought. It is the only decision you make looking at 13 cards rather than 26. After the opening lead you will be able to see dummy as well as your own hand.”

 

Tina then goes on to explain the solution to the problems in the videos. A look at the above hand would suggest that while “top of a sequence” Heart-smallJ lead might be safe, it is hardly going to be the lead to beat the contract.

Also, since one’s opponents have stopped in game, there is a very real chance that your partner is sitting there with some high cards. If you become a little more adventurous in your choice of opening lead, you might find partner’s suit and either restrict overtricks or on a really good day, even beat the contract.

Ruling out therefore the two suits bid by one’s opponents, it comes down to a choice of black suits. Since West would have bid 3Spade-small had they held four spades (in case their partner also held four spades), that might be the suit to attack at trick one.

Had you done so, your partner will be delighted and so will you! These were the four hands:

East Deals
Both Vul
K Q 10 6 3
A
J 9 7
J 8 6 4
J 9 4
K 7 2
A Q 10 5
K 7 3
 
N
W   E
S
 
A 5 2
Q 8 4 3
K 8 6
A Q 9
 
8 7
J 10 9 6 5
4 3 2
10 5 2
West North East South
    1  Pass
2  Pass 2 NT Pass
3 NT All pass    

 

East will duck the first two rounds of spades and be forced to win the third round. East has four diamond and three club tricks along with Spade-smallA but they will have to play hearts to gain a ninth trick….and when they do, up goes North’s ace to be followed by two more rounds of spades to beat the contract by one trick.

Bet you were glad you led a spade. Your partner most certainly was.

Tina has a most pleasant, most personable style in explaining the problem and the solution. The videos are well worth a look, no matter what level of player you are.

These free video lessons are offered by Tina McVeigh and LearnBridgeOnline.com

Tina comments:

“Once you are registered, you will be able to watch the first video immediately and the following three videos will be emailed to you on a weekly basis.

These lessons are made for beginner and intermediate players but could be nice reminders for more experienced players.

Please share with your bridge friends! Thank you!”
https://learnbridgeonline.com/tina-mcveigh/
I hope you enjoy.

 TEAMS...and Defending!

Here's the situation:


South Deals
Both Vul
Q 10 8 7
J 3
K J 7 2
A 6 3
J 3
A 9 6 5
Q 10 6 4
Q 10 5
 
N
W   E
S
   
West North East South
you dummy    
      1 NT
Pass 2  Pass 2 
Pass 2 NT Pass 3 NT
All pass      

 1NT was 12-14 and 2Club-small simple Stayman. You lead Diamond-small4 and that goes toDiamond-small2, your partner's Diamond-small8 and declarer's Diamond-smallA. Declarer then plays a club to the ace and a second club to their Club-smallJ and your Club-smallQ, partner following suit. What now? You have until Monday morning to work out your answer.

Richard Solomon

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